Archive for November, 2017

Growing Up in Words: Blog Post by Becky Gawn

Gish 

When reading texts such as ‘The Thing Around Your Neck’ and ‘Who’s Irish’ you realise you have forgotten what it is like to grow up. Everyone has their memories but being able to re-live these is easier when reading an accurate version of what truly happened. 

I had a relatively average upbringing and fitting in came easily. When thinking about what it could have been like if I was to have been placed in a different society with a different culture is overwhelming. Adichie however manages to show how it can be done and how quickly time can pass. Within five months you can both gain and loose relationships and very rarely are you unaware of the lost relationships. By showing a person taken out of her natural surroundings during a pinnacle age stresses how much can be forgotten. Contrasted with Jen who is constantly reminiscing of what a Chinese girl should be reminds us as the reader of how complex it is when trying to comply to societal norms which feel alien to those involved.  

What is achieved in Adichie’s work from providing us with a real, personal account is showing us what it is like to be a stranger. We see our protagonist leave home to her stay with an uncle (not blood related) but she wanted to remain true to herself, remember who she was and where she came from. Determined is a word I would use to describe her. The emotions felt are insinuated from her uneasiness to engage with others and create relationships. The same can be said for Jen who believe to remain true to her Chinese heritage from her references and eventually being able to live with a family she felt so conflicting to herself.   

Adichie

 Keeping an account of daily interactions and emotions enables a person to look back and recount what has been and how deeply it affected them. Much like Satrapi’s work you can imagine both Adichie and Jen writing at various points of their lives and it being true to each of them. Neither have lost themselves or fallen victim to written for the audience.

 Both of these women have allowed us into their lives at varying moments and reminded us how natural it is to make mistakes. The challenges each person may face will only help to build their character but it is crucial to always remain true to oneself and remember who you are in order to tell your story, your way.  

 

Advertisements

Persepolis: Blog Post by Fern Dalton

satrapi1Marjane Satrapi’s compelling novel/memoir was hard to put down. We are given strong, complex characters that are realistic and we are able to learn from them, allowing us to empathise with them. The fast pace that we are presented with also, brings me, as a reader, to a sense of realism that this is how quickly things do occur and that it is overwhelming, exhilarating and the overall fact that nothing is ever how you expect it to be. It took me into and into a world of crisis and a place where you’re in need of constant reassurance, a piece of history I am not well associated with and place that I haven’t known before. As we see our narrator grow up, we learn and understand with her about the country and culture that she is living in and although as a reader, I am older than her, I struggle to fully understand the happenings in her country, let alone as a twelve year old girl, living through it.

satrapi2

I love how this memoir influenced novel uses frames and a ‘comic strip’ style of writing. With the simple images that Satrapi provides us with an expected strong emotions. The use of symbolism throughout the panels, particularly with the contrasts of light and dark sketches, as well as situations, help create an effective way of communication as well as in the text that accommodates the images. As well as this, Elahi Babak discusses the use of framing in different areas of media and mentions how, “comic art can potentially challenge those modes of political or aesthetic representation that naturalize their own worldviews by erasing or obscuring their own frames”, which I think is particularly important when reading a novel such as Satrapi’s. With endless discussions and politics, international relations and history, we see how her family, and others, challenge their country’s authorities’ and through her representation, we are given what a twelve-year-old see’s through this destruction. Confusion, competition with peers and consequently, when our narrator is removed from the situation, a change of perspective and a lack of identity, until it is mentioned and our narrator retaliate.

satrapi3

The interview with Satrapi was of huge interest to me because she speaks with such confidence and says how her novel is written from a “human point of view”, despite her being female and the narrator being female, it comes from a voice that all humans should recognise and would feel empathy towards this character, because she is human and what right does one human have other another? Satrapi also mentions that the message in this novel is, “that human being[s], anywhere, is the same” and I think that that is imperative to know when reading this novel. Although the narrator discusses, particularly early on in the novel, about social classes, Satrapi emphasises in this interview that everyone has desires, has dreams and most importantly, has the right to live, yet, “we have to understand that the situation isn’t as easy as we think”, because we don’t understand the hardships that others go through and everybody does lead a different live, yet life is conclusive. All humans have the ability to empathise with another human, and we all recognise a person in need, so in this sense, al; humans are the same and I think it’s important to remember that this novel isn’t subjected to just a female voice, but how easily it could be replaced by a male voice, similar to what Satrapi mentions in her interview.

 

 

Deconstruction of Identity in Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis: Blog Post by Sara Gatdula

Screen Shot 2017-11-06 at 14.48.53

In Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, Satrapi deconstructs the negative perception on Iranians through the way she has chosen to tell her story as a graphic novel. It allows the reader to feel the essence of individuality through this framed graphic narrative by the individual frameworks and through the way it captures a scene within it.

In Babak Elahi’s essay ‘Frames and mirrors in Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis’, he expresses the importance of Satrapi’s chosen format in which she tells her story in the style of a graphic novel due to the way it creates a sense of segmented flow within the story, allowing the reader to focus on one frame at a time and thus the individual story within it. This is further shown as Satrapi weaves different tales of both herself and other individuals which reflects and mirrors the social constraints imposed upon them and the way it moulds their identity as an individual.

This segmentation of the story, through the use of frames, mirrors the need to deconstruct ones imposed identity and to reconstruct their own. This is reflected by Satrapi’s sense of identity crisis which is a reoccurring theme within Persepolis, where in which Marji’s life becomes unbearable as she becomes homeless for two months and when she tries to commit suicide. These are key scenes as these reflects the moments where in which Marji deconstructs her own identity and in turn after these episodes, reconstructs it through the act of coming back to her home Tehran, after becoming homeless and changing herself after her failed suicide attempts.

Screen Shot2

This especially links to Julia Kristeva’s ‘A Question of Subjectivity: An Interview’ where she speaks about the way our identity is always being ‘trialled’ and we must therefore adopt and evolve. This sense of Ideological and psychosocial framing of one’s own identity is the problem Marji has faced. From the very restricted religious ideological framework she must obey to her more modern views and need for emancipation, she must continually reconstruct her own identity in order to create a sense of balance and merge her fragmented identities into one. As mentioned, the need to deconstruct and reconstruct one’s identity, in my opinion is quite a repetitive process where in which we are subjected to constant social constraints, therefore constantly moulding one’s identity.